Last edited by Zulurr
Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

6 edition of Fish Antifreeze Proteins (Molecular Aspects of Fish and Marine Biology, V. 1) found in the catalog.

Fish Antifreeze Proteins (Molecular Aspects of Fish and Marine Biology, V. 1)

  • 370 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by World Scientific Publishing Company .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Biotechnology,
  • Fishes (ichthyology),
  • Proteins,
  • Protein Engineering,
  • Food Science,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Fisheries,
  • Nature,
  • Science,
  • Life Sciences - Zoology - General,
  • Life Sciences - Biochemistry,
  • Life Sciences - Biology - Molecular Biology,
  • Composition,
  • Fish,
  • Antifreeze proteins,
  • Fishes

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsKathryn Vanya Ewart (Editor), Choy L. Hew (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages236
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9195479M
    ISBN 109810248997
    ISBN 109789810248994

    Antifreeze proteins are very clever. They slow down the formation of bonds between water molecules, which prevents the formation of ice crystals in the fish's blood. Scientists are working out how they could use these antifreeze proteins as a non-polluting de-icer for cars and machinery. This book describes the current knowledge on fish antifreeze proteins and glycoproteins. It is divided into 9 chapters that cover antifreeze glycoproteins from Antarctic fishes; physiological ecology of antifreeze proteins; functions, molecular interactions and biological roles of fish antifreeze proteins; their origins and evolution; structure; control of antifreeze protein gene expression in Cited by:

    ADVERTISEMENTS: In this article we will discuss about the molecular biology in fish breeding. The discovery of recombinant DNA technology has made a revolution in the modern molecular biology. Through this technique, large quantities of proteins present in trace amount, as well as other biologically active substances, can be generated through biotechnology and these genetically [ ].   The Danger Posed to Fish by Low Sea Water Temperatures. Antifreeze Proteins. Winter Flounder: A Model for Antifreeze Protein Freeze Resistance Strategies. Low Temperature Limitations to Sea Cage Aquaculture. Antifreeze Protein Gene Transfer; Progress to Date. Future Directions in the Production of Freeze‐Resistant Salmon. Summary and Cited by: 3.

      In the icy waters of the Antarctic, most of the native fish have special proteins in their blood that act like antifreeze. The proteins bind to ice crystals, keeping them small to prevent the.   Antarctic fish have antifreeze in their veins "We discovered what appears to be an undesirable consequence of the evolution of antifreeze proteins .


Share this book
You might also like
Colorful animals

Colorful animals

A dictionary of contemporary quotations

A dictionary of contemporary quotations

boke of receipts from the grayte kitchen

boke of receipts from the grayte kitchen

Care Bears

Care Bears

Stravinsky project

Stravinsky project

Hidden lights

Hidden lights

Age determination methods for fishes studied by the Groundfish Program at the Pacific Biological Station

Age determination methods for fishes studied by the Groundfish Program at the Pacific Biological Station

Publication of information about unused and underused land.

Publication of information about unused and underused land.

measurement and valuation of health related quality of life

measurement and valuation of health related quality of life

A fresh start tomorrow

A fresh start tomorrow

Photographic surveying

Photographic surveying

Management disasters and how to prevent them

Management disasters and how to prevent them

Structure and evolution of the stars.

Structure and evolution of the stars.

bag boys

bag boys

Making America Volume 1 With History Student Research Passkey 4th Ed + Cobbs Major Problems American History Volume 1 + History Handbook

Making America Volume 1 With History Student Research Passkey 4th Ed + Cobbs Major Problems American History Volume 1 + History Handbook

Stepper

Stepper

Fish Antifreeze Proteins (Molecular Aspects of Fish and Marine Biology, V. 1) Download PDF EPUB FB2

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xii, pages: illustrations ; 24 cm. Contents: Early research on proteins from the antarctic / R.A. Feeney and D.T. Osuga --Physiological ecology of antifreeze proteins / S.V.

Goddard and G.L. Fletcher --Fish antifreeze proteins / K.V. Ewart --Origins and evolution of fish antifreeze proteins / C.C-M. Cheng and A.L. DeVries. Fish Antifreeze Proteins: Recent Gene Evolution Article in Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 43(5) April with 46 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Antifreeze Proteins. Antifreeze proteins lower the freezing point temperature. They are present in many fish and invertebrates as well as plants to prevent them freezing in cold weather or cold water.

Further information on types of antifreeze proteins and their applications are contained in Hassas-Roudsari and Goff (). Antifreeze proteins produced in some fish have hooked the attention of industry. But chemists are still casting inquiries into how these proteins act to prevent some species of flounder, cod, and sculpin from icing up in below-zero Centigrade water.

RED HERRING: Although antifreeze proteins produced by the flounder are the most studied, they may be the least representative. The concentration of these proteins, depending on the fish species, the type of antifreeze proteins, geographic locations and seasons can vary from an undetectable level in the summer to a high of 8 to 25 mg/ml in the winter.

So far, all of these proteins have been isolated from the sera and would indicate their extracellular mode of action. To cover the diverse aspects of fish antifreeze study, a wide spectrum of researchers have been selected to write clear and comprehensive articles on different areas of antifreeze research.

This book should be a very useful and informative resource for life science researchers. Fish Antifreeze Proteins: Functions, Molecular Interactions and. These antifreeze proteins are a group of unique macromolecules that help some polar and subpolar marine bony fishes avoid freezing in their icy habitats.

The proteins were discovered by Dr. Art DeVries from fish that he collected at McMurdo Station while he was a. With NSF support, Arthur DeVries discovered antifreeze proteins in Antarctic notothenioid fish in the late s, and was the first to describe how the proteins bind to ice crystals in the blood to prevent the fish from freezing.

The most recent antifreeze discovery was supported by. Fish in McMurdo Sound and elsewhere in the seas around Antarctica have to survive in temperatures below freezing. It’s not surprising, then, that they have evolved natural antifreeze proteins. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: 1 online resource (xii, pages): illustrations.

Contents: Early research on proteins from the antarctic / R.A. Feeney and D.T. Osuga --Physiological ecology of antifreeze proteins / S.V. Goddard and G.L. Fletcher --Fish antifreeze proteins / K.V. Ewart --Origins and evolution of fish antifreeze proteins / C.C-M.

Cheng and. Antifreeze Proteins and Organismal Freezing Avoidance in Polar Fishes Article in Fish Physiology December with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Antifreeze proteins enable organisms to avoid freezing under extreme conditions. The greatest diversity of known antifreeze proteins is in teleost fish and much work has gone into the understanding of these proteins and their eeze proteins are an exciting model system for the study of protein-surface(ice) : Hardcover.

The ensuing years have witnessed a great deal of work on AFPs (antifreeze proteins; not all are glycoproteins) in a number of phylogenetically diverse fish species, much of it by DeVries and his colleagues (5–7), revealing a number of types differing in their structure and amino-acid by: Most gene duplications studied have been silenced and subjected to deleterious mutations, rendering them useless.

1 However, a class of proteins called antifreeze proteins (AFPs) appear to have gone against this trend. AFPs are found in a wide variety of organisms: fish, insects, plants and microbes. Antifreeze proteins are found in a wide range of overwintering plants where they inhibit the growth and recrystallization of ice that forms in intercellular spaces.

Unlike antifreeze proteins found in fish and insects, plant antifreeze proteins have multiple, hydrophilic ice-binding by: insect antifreeze proteins are times more active than fish proteins. This difference probably reflects the lower temperatures encountered by insects on land. In contrast, aquatic organisms are exposed only to -1 to -2 °C below freezing.

During the extreme winter months, the spruce budworm resists freezing at temperatures approaching The main secret of these unique fish, though—who have a natural lifespan of 40 years and can weigh in at over pounds when full-grown—lies in a special protein that acts like antifreeze.

By making this unique antifreeze glycoprotein, the Antarctic toothfish are able to keep their blood from freezing. So, even though antifreeze proteins help fish survive, they don’t explain how complex, specific proteins could arise by mutations.

To find out more from Creation Ministries International visit. A fish which uses a 'natural antifreeze' to thrive in the Antarctic for more than 42 million years is under threat, say Yale researchers - the protective protein they evolved means they can't adapt.

Fish that live in the polar oceans survive at low temperatures by virtue of ‘antifreeze’ plasma proteins 1 in the blood that bind to ice crystals and prevent these from growing.

However, the. The answer lies in antifreeze – proteins that bind to ice crystals and prevent the freezing of cells. The nature of these proteins has been studied in detail, partly because of their usefulness in industry.

Ice cream manufacturers are using arctic fish antifreeze proteins to avoid the formation of ice crystals during the cooling process. Antifreeze proteins enable organisms to avoid freezing under extreme conditions.

The greatest diversity of known antifreeze proteins is in teleost fish and much work has gone into the understanding of these proteins and their eeze proteins are an exciting model system for the study of protein-surface(ice) interaction.5/5(1). DeVries discovered antifreeze proteins in Antarctic notothenioid fishes in the late s, and was the first to describe how the proteins bind to ice crystals in the blood to prevent the fishes.